Optimist to the un-bitter end. It's time to share.

 

Will you come and follow me…? 

Originally from Iona community in Glasgow, this hymn was frequently sung during my school days at church. I heard it again today, interestingly, in Sheffield Cathedral. Here’s a rendition much more enjoyed by me than the often strange Americanised renditions I hear of hymns on Youtube. :)

twloha:

"There’s light even in the darkest places." 
Don’t give up today. There is hope for you.

twloha:

"There’s light even in the darkest places." 

Don’t give up today. There is hope for you.

neurosciencestuff:

Primate calls, like human speech, can help infants form categories
Human infants’ responses to the vocalizations of non-human primates shed light on the developmental origin of a crucial link between human language and core cognitive capacities, a new study reports.
Previous studies have shown that even in infants too young to speak, listening to human speech supports core cognitive processes, including the formation of object categories.
Alissa Ferry, lead author and currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Language, Cognition and Development Lab at the Scuola Internationale Superiore di Studi Avanzati in Trieste, Italy, together with Northwestern University colleagues, documented that this link is initially broad enough to include the vocalizations of non-human primates.
"We found that for 3- and 4-month-old infants, non-human primate vocalizations promoted object categorization, mirroring exactly the effects of human speech, but that by six months, non-human primate vocalizations no longer had this effect — the link to cognition had been tuned specifically to human language," Ferry said.
In humans, language is the primary conduit for conveying our thoughts. The new findings document that for young infants, listening to the vocalizations of humans and non-human primates supports the fundamental cognitive process of categorization. From this broad beginning, the infant mind identifies which signals are part of their language and begins to systematically link these signals to meaning.
Furthermore, the researchers found that infants’ response to non-human primate vocalizations at three and four months was not just due to the sounds’ acoustic complexity, as infants who heard backward human speech segments failed to form object categories at any age.
Susan Hespos, co-author and associate professor of psychology at Northwestern said, “For me, the most stunning aspect of these findings is that an unfamiliar sound like a lemur call confers precisely the same effect as human language for 3- and 4-month-old infants. More broadly, this finding implies that the origins of the link between language and categorization cannot be derived from learning alone.”
"These results reveal that the link between language and object categories, evident as early as three months, derives from a broader template that initially encompasses vocalizations of human and non-human primates and is rapidly tuned specifically to human vocalizations," said Sandra Waxman, co-author and Louis W. Menk Professor of Psychology at Northwestern.
Waxman said these new results open the door to new research questions.
"Is this link sufficiently broad to include vocalizations beyond those of our closest genealogical cousins," asks Waxman, "or is it restricted to primates, whose vocalizations may be perceptually just close enough to our own to serve as early candidates for the platform on which human language is launched?"
(Image: Corbis)

neurosciencestuff:

Primate calls, like human speech, can help infants form categories

Human infants’ responses to the vocalizations of non-human primates shed light on the developmental origin of a crucial link between human language and core cognitive capacities, a new study reports.

Previous studies have shown that even in infants too young to speak, listening to human speech supports core cognitive processes, including the formation of object categories.

Alissa Ferry, lead author and currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Language, Cognition and Development Lab at the Scuola Internationale Superiore di Studi Avanzati in Trieste, Italy, together with Northwestern University colleagues, documented that this link is initially broad enough to include the vocalizations of non-human primates.

"We found that for 3- and 4-month-old infants, non-human primate vocalizations promoted object categorization, mirroring exactly the effects of human speech, but that by six months, non-human primate vocalizations no longer had this effect — the link to cognition had been tuned specifically to human language," Ferry said.

In humans, language is the primary conduit for conveying our thoughts. The new findings document that for young infants, listening to the vocalizations of humans and non-human primates supports the fundamental cognitive process of categorization. From this broad beginning, the infant mind identifies which signals are part of their language and begins to systematically link these signals to meaning.

Furthermore, the researchers found that infants’ response to non-human primate vocalizations at three and four months was not just due to the sounds’ acoustic complexity, as infants who heard backward human speech segments failed to form object categories at any age.

Susan Hespos, co-author and associate professor of psychology at Northwestern said, “For me, the most stunning aspect of these findings is that an unfamiliar sound like a lemur call confers precisely the same effect as human language for 3- and 4-month-old infants. More broadly, this finding implies that the origins of the link between language and categorization cannot be derived from learning alone.”

"These results reveal that the link between language and object categories, evident as early as three months, derives from a broader template that initially encompasses vocalizations of human and non-human primates and is rapidly tuned specifically to human vocalizations," said Sandra Waxman, co-author and Louis W. Menk Professor of Psychology at Northwestern.

Waxman said these new results open the door to new research questions.

"Is this link sufficiently broad to include vocalizations beyond those of our closest genealogical cousins," asks Waxman, "or is it restricted to primates, whose vocalizations may be perceptually just close enough to our own to serve as early candidates for the platform on which human language is launched?"

(Image: Corbis)

asleehp:

busiest:


This is the official ‘i care’ symbol. This is how it works:
Basically you reblog this, and your followers know that you care and that they can message you about anything anon or not and you will reply back or at least look at their message.



always

asleehp:

busiest:

This is the official ‘i care’ symbol. This is how it works:

Basically you reblog this, and your followers know that you care and that they can message you about anything anon or not and you will reply back or at least look at their message.

always

theswinginsixties:

Jane Fonda

Did Jane Fonda ever play in A Streetcar Named Desire? I can’t tell whether she’d be a Stella or a Blanche…

theswinginsixties:

Jane Fonda

Did Jane Fonda ever play in A Streetcar Named Desire? I can’t tell whether she’d be a Stella or a Blanche…

It’s not that simple. You know what makes a good person good? When a good person does something bad, they own up to it. They try to learn something from it, and they move on.

Ron Swanson  (via suspiciousdevil)

Played 311 times

Mi tradì, quell’alma ingrata, 
Infelice, o Dio, mi fa. 
Ma tradita e abbandonata, 
Provo ancor per lui pietà. 
Quando sento il mio tormento, 
Di vendetta il cor favella, 
Ma se guardo il suo cimento, 
Palpitando il cor mi va. 

Fuck, I miss the feeling of flow from singing. After this thesis, I’m gonna become one again. :)

(Source: operanerd)

English Pronunciation

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

slightzephyrs:

cuddliest:

papervaglife:

kanrose:

If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world.

After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he’d prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud.

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[source]

I fucking hate this thing

I LOVE THIS

I just read this out loud. I love this!

I AM GOING TO FILM THIS RIGHT NOW

(Source: kanrose)